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Loch Ness Monster Caught On New Photos Sparks Online Debate

Tourist's photo showing creature rising from water sparks online claims that it could be one of the best ever pictures of Loch Ness Monster

Loch Ness Monster Caught On New Photos Sparks Online Debate

Loch Ness Monster Caught On New Photos Sparks Online Debate

New pictures of a strange creature swimming through the Loch’s waters snapped by a British tourist have reignited the debate over whether Nessie might be real. The picture was reportedly taken by Steve Challice of South Hampton. He was on vacation in Scotland in September final yr, after they visited the Urquhart Fort on the banks of the well-known loch. After sharing the picture of what seems to be a big creature rising from the water on-line, individuals started to remark that it is perhaps the monster.

While admiring the sights, what appeared to be a long fish swimming by caught his eye, he told the Daily Record.

“I started taking a couple of shots and then this big fish came to the surface and then went back down,”

“Personally, I know there has been some interest and some people are saying it’s the monster, but I don’t believe that,” he said.

“I started taking a couple of shots and then this big fish came to the surface and then went back down again.

“It only appeared in one shot and to be honest that was something of a fluke.

“I watched for a while as you can see from the last picture but didn’t see it again.”

Challice said. He added that while he may have taken several shots, the creature appeared in only one shot, something which the English tourist considered as something of a fluke. Challice revealed that he waited for a little while, hoping it might appear again, but it did not.

He said his first thought was that it was a catfish, but he wasn’t sure, so he posted the picture on Facebook to see if anyone could identify what type of fish it was.

The Latest Image Of The Elusive Creature?

Challice did not give much thought to the photo until the recent COVID-19 lockdown, where he found lots of time to check out his many vacation snapshots. He then posted the photo of what he believes is a large fish online but did not expect it would spark new speculation by theorists that he may have captured the latest image of the elusive creature.

Loch Ness Monster Caught On New Photos Sparks Online Debate

While the English tourist enjoys the attention given to the picture, he believes that it was just a large catfish. In an interview with the Daily Record, Challice said he may have just snapped a photo of a catfish or something similar. “As seals get in from the sea, then I expect that’s what it is and would explain why these sightings are so few and far between,” the English tourist added.

The Loch Ness Monster

Popularly known as ‘Nessie,’ the Loch Ness Monster is one of the enduring myths surrounding the huge and deep freshwater lake in the Scottish Highlands, which extends around 37 kilometers south-west of Inverness. Only a few photographs of the assumed prehistoric creatures have surfaced over several decades, with most of them classified as hoaxes.

Just a Big Fish Story?

Challice still defends his photos as authentic and unedited, even when he doesn’t actually believe the creature in them to be anything strange.

“There are pics on Google showing large monsters with lots of loops like a snake or something and my image is nothing like that. I genuinely think, to this day, it’s just a big fish,”

he said.

The oldest story of a monster living in Loch Ness dates all the way back to the 6th century, when the Irish monk Adomnán described a man having been attacked by an underwater beast while swimming.

One of the most famous photographs of the monster, knows as “the surgeon’s photograph,” was taken in 1934 and has been widely circulated, even though it has been proven to be a hoax.

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